Archive

Posts Tagged ‘history’

White House 101

White House 101 presents facts and information about the White House and its place in American history. Site features include biographies for each president, fun facts about various presidents, and pictures and facts about Presidential pets. Historical information is also available on the site. Visitors can take a virtual tour of the White House and learn about its history and its residents. Information is available about the Vice President’s Residence, the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Camp David, and Air Force One. The site also presents information for those interested in fellowships, internships, tours, and special events. A video series offers behind-the-scenes glimpses of life inside the White House. This site provides historical information that could be used for history lessons and projects in upper elementary, middle school, and secondary classrooms.

Image: Chuck Felix / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Newseum Digital Classroom

Newseum is an interactive museum located in Washington, D. C. that features galleries of artifacts related to news stories around the world. A preview of must-see features of the museum includes exhibits related to 9/11, the fall of the Berlin Wall, Watergate, the Unabomber’s cabin, and more. The Newseum presents a collection of newspaper front pages from around the world. Each front page thumbnail links to the website for the featured newspaper.

Another feature of the Newseum is the Digital Classroom which showcases a collection of video lessons related to social studies, civics, English, government, history, technology, and journalism. Each lesson includes a lesson plan, a viewing guide, and related links to additional instructional resources. Plans are designed to be used to prepare students for a Newseum field trip, but can be implemented as standalone lessons.

One informative lesson explores the Civil Rights Movement. The video lesson presents historic video footage and explores the role of the press in civil rights. The video presents the Civil Rights era from the perspectives of people who experienced it, including Congressional representatives; news editors and reporters; and civil rights activists.

The video guide features warm-up discussion questions, questions to consider while watching the video, and quotations featured in the presentation. The guide also includes questions for group discussion and activities for exploring civil rights, the First Amendment, and the role of a free press in American society.

The lesson plan includes an instructional activity in which students research answers to questions related to key events, court cases and people involved in the civil rights movement. It also features Dr. M. L. King’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” The letter was written in response to a Birmingham newspaper article entitled, “A Call for Unity.” The article was written by African-American clergy and urged African-Americans to withdraw from public demonstrations and seek justice through the courts when their rights were denied. The lesson also features newspaper articles published in the 1950’s and 1960’s as well as modern-day articles related to historical coverage of the Civil Rights Movement.

Image: Salvatore Vuono / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

e-Pals Global Learning Community

The e-Pals Global Learning Community is a safe social learning platform that can be used in K12 classrooms for communication and collaboration with classes around the world. The site allows teachers to link their classrooms with others for the purpose of engaging in collaborative educational projects. The project database can be searched by classroom profiles, country, by project, or by perusing teacher forums. All projects are linked with national standards.

The Digital Storytelling Classroom Project is featured on the e-Pals Projects for Collaboration page. The Project Overview explains that students will learn about the ancient practice of storytelling and then tell a story using modern technology tools. They will participate in an email exchange to discuss the process as they develop a story topic, write a story, create or find appropriate images, and share and reflect on their story. The project includes the following components: Essential Questions, Objectives, Culminating Activity, Project Elements, and National Standards.

This project would be appropriate for a variety of classes and could be adapted for any grade level. A look at the Digital Storytelling Teacher Forum reveals a range of classes from first grade through high school who would like to collaborate on this project for history, African American Studies, and language arts. In a middle school technology classroom, this might be implemented as an integrated project to include objectives from American History, language arts and technology. Students could interview World War II veterans and record their stories using technology tools. It might be interesting to partner with a classroom in Japan or Hawaii and compare stories from the perspectives of residents of those areas.

Image: Ken Cole | Agency: Dreamstime.com
The image above depicts part of the Second World War Memorial in Washington, DC